Highlights and Timestamps 01:00 Paulo introduces Jasper and Shawn from Eezee; 02:09 How CTO Jasper and CCO Shawn found Eezee: “I have dealt with many people and I realized that there are many entrepreneurs who talk…But in the end they do not walk the talk. It was very refreshing, getting to know Logan. He is […]

Eezee Team

S03E13: Eezee CTO Jasper Yap and CCO Shawn Seet on building and selling Southeast Asia’s middleware for procurement and supply chain management

Highlights and Timestamps

  1. 01:00 Paulo introduces Jasper and Shawn from Eezee;
  2. 02:09 How CTO Jasper and CCO Shawn found Eezee:I have dealt with many people and I realized that there are many entrepreneurs who talk…But in the end they do not walk the talk. It was very refreshing, getting to know Logan. He is an entrepreneur who walks the talk, despite not knowing how to code, not knowing how to spin up a website and whatnot. He just went ahead and he got it done.”
  3. 05:34 How Shawn’s first role in Eezee managing HR and culture helps him in his current role as CCO: “When a lot of professionals transition from an individual contributor role to a sales lead role, they forget that the essence of a sales leader is really about how you motivate your team, how you grow your team and how you set them up for success.” 
  4. 06:23 Eezee’s latest initiatives with the Singapore government: “Our recent partnership with the Singapore government will transform and set the bar for procurement for many years to come. In the future, physical forms and physical quotations will disappear.”
  5. 07:30 What enterprise companies look for in software applications: “It used to be they’re just interested in maybe Zoom meetings and webinars and how to digitize things. But now it’s really about how we can do things faster…Suddenly all these buzz words start coming out and you start having really in-depth conversations.”
  6. 10:21 How the enterprise approach to digitalization has shifted in 2020 to 2021: “So diving into best practices is our favorite approach because it’s real life use cases that are applicable, and everybody wants to know what world-class workflow processes look like.” 
  7. 14:01 Jasper explains Eezee’s ecosystem from tech perspective: “We envision our infrastructure to be the Suez Canal for procurement in the B2B environment.”
  8. 16:42 Shawn’s advice for MNCs on digitalization: “[Digitalization] is also how you set the people below you up for success. Give them resources, have trust and faith in them because the management alone can’t drive it on their own.”
  9. 19:08 Leadership approaches of Eezee’s CTO and CCO: “At the end of the day, it all depends on your philosophy. Do you just want to give a guy a fish everyday to eat, or do you want to teach the guy how to fish? So at Eezee for us, it’s all about how we set people up for success.”
  10. 21:52 How Jasper builds and develops Eezee’s tech team: “And because of the stage of our business, we really look for the hackers, the software engineers who are very good at delivering an MVP. They may or may not have an education in comp science, but they have the drive.”
  11. 23:46 Eezee’s CTO and CCO on the next five years of the company: “That is what we see Eezee will become in the future: the middleware for procurement and supply chain management.”
  12. 25:32 Rapid Fire Round: “Focus on impact, focus on traction, focus on value. And I think that has helped Eezee and me and the co-founders prioritize what to do and where to bring the business next in our formative years. So really move fast, focus on impact.” 

In this episode we are back with an interesting set of guests. We have two guests with us here today and compared to our In this episode, instead of our usual lineup of founder-CEOs, we are back with an interesting set of guests — the CTO and co-founder as well as the chief commercial officer of Eezee, a B2B marketplace based in Singapore supporting the digitalization of procurement for government, corporates, and SMEs not just in Singapore, but across the region as well. The beauty of having both the CTO and CCO on this episode is that we don’t only get to see other dimensions of building a tech company, but also the synergies between tech and sales in driving digital adoption for enterprise and building a strong team across functions.

About our guests

Our first guest is Jasper Yap. So he’s the CTO and co-founder at Eezee. Prior to Eezee, he was developing and engineering products for SMEs, through fintech and aerospace applications. He’s also part of the Forbes 30 under 30 retail and e-commerce category alongside his co-founder Terrence.

 

 

 

Our second guest is Shawn Seet. Sean is currently the chief commercial officer of Eezee. Prior to Eezee, he had built his career around management consulting, more than six years supporting enterprises across various industries in APAC, helping businesses go digital and improving consumer experiences. In Eezee, he joined as head of strategy and towards the end of last year, he took on his new role as chief commercial officer. 

 

 

Transcript

Paulo: All right. So it’s great to have you guys here on the show today. We’ve previously had Logan in our last season, where he gave us more of an overview of what Eezee is all about, the future of B2B commerce in the region, and a lot of exciting stuff that had happened in the past year. But in this episode, we wanted to focus a bit more on the specialties you guys have, right? But first things first, we can talk all about procurement and B2B commerce later on, but I just want to really introduce you to our audience. So I’d love for you guys to share your Eezee origin stories. We can start with Jasper since he’s a co-founder. So how did you find Eezee or how did Eezee find you? 

Jasper: Great question. So it was in 2017, when I first met Logan. I was a fresh grad from Ngee Ann Polytechnic. I was connected to Logan via the PolyTechnic’s Sandbox. Incubator. So back then I was running a software development agency and Logan pitched the idea of Eezee. And when he pitched it to me, I thought, “Hey, this was a great idea. It was a huge problem. And the problem was a deep problem. We have to solve many things and that gets to an engineer.” 

After talking to Logan, I asked him, “Hey, so you wanted to start this business. So what have you done so far?” 

And he said,” I started a website on WordPress.  I’ve sold some items.” 

I said, “Wow, you’ve started a website, but you’re not an engineer. So how’s it going?” 

He said, “Oh, the website is doing well. It has generated some revenue.” 

[Sales] was quite high for a website that was in that state, and I thought, “Wow, Logan is an entrepreneur who walks the talk.” 

That was very inspiring and amazing and attractive for me because I have dealt with many people and I realized that there are many entrepreneurs who talk. They talk about wanting to do this, wanting to do that. But in the end they do not walk the talk. It was very refreshing, getting to know Logan and — wow, he is an entrepreneur who walks the talk, despite not knowing how to code, not knowing how to spin up a website and whatnot. He just went ahead and he got it done.

After I considered the business and after talking to Logan, I felt that this is a great business. And I said, “Hey, Logan, you want to build this website? I can build websites for you and I can build exactly the system that you’re looking for. Instead of paying me in cash, why don’t you pay me in equity.” From then on the rest is history. We met, we formed the business and then we just flew [from there].

Paulo: Awesome. I really liked what you said about Logan walking the talk and that sort of attracted you as a developer and engineer to really help him in terms of turning Eezee from just a WordPress site into a fully fledged platform. How about you, Sean? What was your Eezee origin story? 

Shawn: So I’ve actually known Logan for about just over 10 years. So I first got to know him because we were army mates and you go back for reservists almost every year and we chat about work and we chat about life. And I think I reached the stage in my career where I was quite disillusioned with corporate life and I was really keen to get into the tech space. And it was interesting to know that Logan has his own startup in e-commerce and it’s in tech. When I left my job, I had the opportunity to speak to the rest of the co-founders and I really liked how everybody was so driven. There was a real sense of team and unity that really attracted me. I think in most corporations, the culture is quite different. 

So I was initially brought on a project basis to work more on the HR strategy and culture. And that changed really quickly because on my first day, the previous head of sales left and there was a huge gap to fill because sales, revenue and commercials are so important. the bloodline of the company. Having been in sales before, consulting and marketing, that helped me to wear different hats, something that’s very important in a startup. So my previous experiences really helped me to support Eezee in different projects and I’ve not looked back since. 

I have dealt with many people and I realized that there are many entrepreneurs who talk…But in the end they do not walk the talk. It was very refreshing, getting to know Logan. He is an entrepreneur who walks the talk, despite not knowing how to code, not knowing how to spin up a website and whatnot. He just went ahead and he got it done.”

Paulo: That’s quite interesting. As I mentioned earlier, you started as a head of strategy, which was mainly focused on culture, HR, and then your focus shifted more towards sales. How did your initial focus on HR and culture impact the way that you lead sales?

Shawn: So usually in sales, it’s very metric-driven. When a lot of professionals transition from an individual contributor role to a sales lead role, they forget that the essence of a sales leader is really about how you motivate your team, how you grow your team and how you set them up for success. So having that background really helped me to look at things in a different perspective. Even as we were chasing our numbers and trying to grow revenue, it’s all about how we elevate everybody’s standards and help them to get to where they need to be, because ultimately if they succeed, Eezee succeeds.

“When a lot of professionals transition from an individual contributor role to a sales lead role, they forget that the essence of a sales leader is really about how you motivate your team, how you grow your team and how you set them up for success.” 

Paulo: As we like to say at Insignia, P&Ls are a lagging indicator and the leading indicator is really company culture. You’ve illustrated it perfectly in terms of how these two things relate. And speaking of driving sales, Eezee has been really making significant strides in digitizing procurement not just for MNCs, but even for the Singapore government. I’ve read the news about the new initiatives of the government to digitize procurement and how Eezee is a part of it as well. I’ve heard that Jasper is leading up that initiative. So Jasper, could you tell us more about some of these recent partnerships that you’ve had with the Singapore government?

Jasper: So typically it’s the largest organizations that will require the most time to change the processes. We’ve seen this in our work with SMEs, MNCs, and even the government. Our recent partnership with the Singapore government will transform and set the bar for procurement for many years to come. In the future, physical forms and physical quotations will disappear. Our civil servants will no longer have to pay first and claim later, and everything will be seamless end to end from sourcing all the way on the payment. Eezee is honored that we get to lead this space with the Singapore government GovTech and the Ministry of Finance.

“Our recent partnership with the Singapore government will transform and set the bar for procurement for many years to come. In the future, physical forms and physical quotations will disappear.”

Paulo: Definitely sounds exciting. I mean, just the fact that you’re working with the Singapore government really sets a precedent. They see the government doing it, why not them as well. And speaking of working, you started your answer by talking about, it’s typically the largest organizations that are the most challenging to really shift. So what’s that experience like coming from a CTO perspective, Jasper? How does it differ from FinTech apps, for example? How does the development process differ in really driving that adoption?

Jasper: So I think the question is really about enterprise apps versus more consumer-based apps. And what I’ve seen from my experience is that when it comes to developing for enterprise, certain factors are more prominent. Our enterprises care about availability, security, right? These are things that are important because when an enterprise decides to use our software for work, system downtime will cause their employees to be idle. As a result, work gets stuck and employees get frustrated. Purchase orders can’t be sent out. Quotations can’t be generated. All that time-saving is gone. And that’s why system availability is very important. Stability and availability are crucial for B2B mission success. Whereas when it comes to consumer apps, you’re using YouTube or using Google, whenever it goes down, it is a pain, but it’s okay. You can still do something else. It’s not like it’s a need for you to live for consumer apps. Whereas for B2B, it is a mission-critical app for work, and that’s why availability is important. And we put in place many things to make sure that our apps are available 24/7. Our containers will auto recover whenever it goes down. Our systems have automated testing. They will make sure that every time we push an update, 90% of the time nothing will happen. Nothing bad will happen because we have automated testing systems. So that’s availability. 

The other thing that our enterprises care about is security. In recent years, we have seen many cyber attacks crippling organizations and affecting their reputation. As such our MNCs and enterprises are starting to ask us if we are iSO certified. So think about it. We are a startup. We are the people that do first and think later, that’s typically what startups do, right? So when it comes to building a B2B enterprise, that’s something that we had to learn along the way. Our MNC started to ask us, ” How are your systems secure and how do they process data? And how are you putting in place processes that make sure that the right people get access to the right data. That’s interesting because from an enterprise perspective, that is super important. Sometimes deals can be lost because we do not have ISO certification. Whereas when you’re using a consumer app, oftentimes you do not care whether YouTube has an ISO certification or certain systems or Grab or Go-Jek has any ISO certification, you just happily create an account and use the service. So that’s how it’s different. Enterprises require different things and different things speak to them.  

Paulo: That’s really interesting, especially what you mentioned about that ISO certification that it can really be a critical point when it comes to closing a deal with one of these clients. Shawn, since you’re on that front, have you seen that happen, conversing with these corporates or enterprise clients? 

Shawn: Yep. I think there’s increasing education in space. I really like Jasper’s example of security, right? There’s a lot of news and there are data leaks and it’s really damaging to reputations. It’s really damaging to the brand. It’s not just about the CTO’s anymore, but CEOs and the other business leaders need to step in and they really need to make a statement or they need to clear up the mess basically on the front end when they are facing their customers. In terms of the overall state or the overall landscape, the interest has not just matured, but the level of awareness and education has also gone up. It used to be they’re just interested in maybe Zoom meetings and webinars and how to digitize things. But now it’s really about how we can do things faster. Can we do any integration? Is it through APIs? What’s the pen tests that you guys have set up for security?  How do you prove results? What’s your analytics tool? Suddenly all these buzz words start coming out and you start having really in-depth conversations. So what I’m really appreciative of is I have a very supportive team led by Jasper. So I think it’s really about combining our experience in different elements to drive results.

“It used to be they’re just interested in maybe Zoom meetings and webinars and how to digitize things. But now it’s really about how we can do things faster…Suddenly all these buzz words start coming out and you start having really in-depth conversations.”

Paulo: I think it’s really perfect that we have both of you guys here today because of just how tightly you guys work together and speaking of educating enterprises and businesses about going digital. Logan mentioned on the podcast last year how mindsets quickly shifted. Before Eezee would have to go out and sell, and it was a push kind of thing, but now it’s reversed, and then companies are coming in and asking about the platform. So now in 2021, how has this trend moved along from your point of view as CCO. Is it still going strong? Are there any specific changes to how this has evolved? And how has your sales pitch sort of changed and what questions are they asking? 

Shawn: So previously education was in its earlier phase. A lot of just talking about e-commerce and bringing shopping experiences to the B2B customer. There needs to be a lot of reconciliation because to a lot of people that B2C shopping experience doesn’t match what needs to happen in the B2B world in terms of processes and such. So now when we have meetings or pitches, it’s a lot more clear-cut. They know that there are perhaps like five, six things that they need to look at immediately when they’re making a change through digitization.

So, we can dive straight into the sharing of best practices. So if let’s say the original state of the procurement workflow takes on average seven hours or eight hours and that costs up to let’s say a few hundred thousand dollars. If you have say, 2000 transactions every month, we can walk them through the ideal state of doing integration, punch out, and reducing procurement costs by 80%. They seem to get it straight away because they already have that foundational education piece with being more aware about what’s happening everywhere. 

So diving into best practices is our favorite approach because it’s real life use cases that are applicable, and everybody wants to know what world-class workflow processes look like. So that’s really what has shifted since our original conversations with customers last year when they were more focused on learning And more focused on keeping their companies afloat.

“So diving into best practices is our favorite approach because it’s real life use cases that are applicable, and everybody wants to know what world-class workflow processes look like.” 

Paulo: The question has really changed from what do I need, to how do I use this, right. And how do I actually make the most out of this technology that you’re selling to me. And we’ve been talking about the SMEs that you support and the larger enterprises, so even from the supplier side and then from the buyer side as well, but you have a third, I would say like a third pillar in your ecosystem, right? And these are the ERPs that you work with in order to integrate your system with these MNCs. So the SAP Ariba and the Coupa’s of the world. So from this perspective, how do you ensure that the Eezee experience is valuable for these companies as well?

Jasper: From a product and tech perspective, the Eezee infrastructure enables and powers procurement for all of these parties. So the more they use the system, the more data is accumulated and the better it gets. We have created a data warehouse for all parties in the transaction, the ERP systems, the buyers, and the suppliers. And for the first time in history, our buyers get an in-depth look into who from the organization is buying what and how frequently they’re buying these things. Our system is also able to tell our buyers, if an employee has decided to purchase a product that’s more expensive than usual. That’s how we get our buyers to enjoy using the system because as they use it more, they get so much more out of it. And this traditionally requires a heroic effort to put together data, make sense of it, clean it up, and then present something useful. 

And for our suppliers, our sellers, we’ve provided them with data to look at how many impressions they’re generating for their products, which products have more impressions, which products are generating good click-through rates and purchase data. All this data helps them to make meaningful decisions and helps with their pricing strategies. Because if a product has a lot of impressions, but eventually it doesn’t get purchased, probably something to do with the price. And all these things, we put it in a neat package and provide them to our suppliers. As our parties use the platform more, we get more data and it provides more value back to them. 

And for SAP Ariba and Coupa’s of the world, we bring a wide product inventory and supplier base to their system, which makes it more relevant and sticky for their enterprise users. Because you can’t buy anything if there is nobody selling and in Southeast Asia, the problem is that digital penetration is low and there are just not many people selling because they do not know how. Eezee provides that infrastructure and that middleware to enable and power procurement for all these parties. So we envision our infrastructure to be sort of like the Suez Canal for procurement in the B2B environment. And that’s how we provide value back to all our ecosystem players.

“We envision our infrastructure to be the Suez Canal for procurement in the B2B environment.”

Paulo: Yeah, it sounds really great, but I think it should be even better than the Suez Canal, right? It shouldn’t get clogged. What really works is that there’s this feedback loop for all the parties involved. Right. Setting up this win-win situation for everybody involved really makes Eezee also very asset-light as a company as well. Speaking of working with different companies, Shawn, what would be your advice for those working at MNCs listening in, when it comes to going digital in terms of their procurement? And I guess you can also share a case study or some experience working with one of your clients. 

Shawn: My personal take is that digitalization is all or nothing. It’s going to be risky. It’s not going to be as risky as not innovating and staying where you are. We’ve seen so many companies fall and fail because they refuse to innovate. So I would say, everybody, whether you’re in an enterprise MNC or in a small seller, you have to go for digitalization. You need to evolve because everybody else is evolving with the times. For professionals that are listening in, I think it’s about creating the right projects within your companies, little use cases where you can prove impact before there’s huge buy-in from the management because digitalization takes a lot of resources. We are quite lucky that for most of the clients that we work with, it’s primarily driven from the management because they understand the dangers of not innovating and not digitalizing. 

So we are working with one of the world’s largest ports and helping them to digitalize their tail-end procurement. So what I really love about their leadership team or their management team is that they were involved right from the very first meeting. So Logan, Jasper and I went to a meeting. It was COVID times, COVID measures. They couldn’t fit everybody in one room. We were like people in two to three rooms, even though we’re physically there, dialing in because they were all vested in what was going to come or what’s going to happen. I think that’s a commitment and a message that leadership in MNCs need to take. And if they really believe in it, there are people who will believe in it, but it’s also how you set the people below you up for success. Give them resources, have trust and faith in them because the management alone can’t drive it on their own. It really takes a whole team effort to make it happen. That’s what I think are the core ingredients that MNCs need to take to digitalize.  

“[Digitalization] is also how you set the people below you up for success. Give them resources, have trust and faith in them because the management alone can’t drive it on their own.”

Paulo: I really like that story that you just shared, I’m pretty sure that excitement coming from working with these kinds of clients really motivates you guys working at Eezee, especially if they’re really eager to try all these new things and especially when leadership is involved and they really want to empower everybody in their organization to be involved as well. 

And speaking of empowerment, I’d like to shift more towards your leadership, as we mentioned earlier, culture being such an integral part of driving the business. Since we have the opportunity to have both the CTO and the CCO on the show, I’d like to compare and contrast your leadership approaches. Jasper can start. How would you say your leadership approach is considering that you’re the CTO and the specific scope that you have within the company? 

Jasper: I think there’s too much to share, but if I would pick one, I think everybody makes mistakes. And from the tech team or technology, a mistake will mean that the website goes down or can’t be used. And our engineers have introduced many bugs over the years, but that doesn’t necessarily make them bad engineers. So my approach to handling mistakes is really to prioritize the learning. Instead of blaming, we focus on how we can prevent a mistake from happening again. And of course, now that this engineer has learned the lesson, he or she has become a better engineer. But on the other hand, if a mistake is repeatedly made, then of course necessary actions will have to be taken. We focus on how we can prevent a mistake and we focus less on blaming and focus on the learning. 

Paulo: Yeah, I think it’s really great. And you try to help people learn wherever they can, and Then when they do things right, you definitely reward them for doing a great job. Shawn, how about you?  What’s your approach? 

Shawn: One thing that’s really interesting about us in management is that we are very different people, but we have very similar values and our leadership approach is quite aligned because we have values that we document, we stand by, and we share with the rest of the team. A specific example that I can give is that we believe that quality is no accident. So that really puts a lot of focus on the day-to-day activities that we do. It’s not really about just doing things quickly. It’s really about how you do things, the intent behind it. And how you can always do things better. So for me, that’s really important. I also am continuously learning from the different leaders in Eezee. The example that Jasper gave on helping someone become a better version of who they were, it’s really important. At the end of the day, it all depends on your philosophy. Do you just want to give a guy a fish everyday to eat, or do you want to teach the guy how to fish? So at Eezee for us, it’s all about how we set people up for success. And we hope to continue this and build a really strong leadership team of Asian leaders.

At the end of the day, it all depends on your philosophy. Do you just want to give a guy a fish everyday to eat, or do you want to teach the guy how to fish? So at Eezee for us, it’s all about how we set people up for success.”

Paulo: Definitely. I can see the similarity in terms of developing leaders regardless of whatever role they’re playing in the company.  Jasper, I’d like to get back to you since we have you on and really talk about one of the more pertinent challenges in Southeast Asia that a lot of founders face. And that’s really finding tech talent. What has your experience been like building out Eezee’s tech team in particular and your approach to hiring?

Jasper: Honestly it has been tough. Building a tech team in Singapore is — we’re fighting for talent here, Singapore is home to many MNCs and unicorn startups. Our fresh grads, our young talents would rather work in those companies. But thankfully we have found a few believers who were bold enough to embark on a journey with us. And because of the stage of our business, we really look for the hackers, the software engineers who are very good at delivering an MVP. They may or may not have an education in comp science, but they have the drive. They have hunger and they display entrepreneurial tendencies. Because hackers, they focus on how can I get this done real quick, make sure we keep all the MVP features, instead of how can I build this for scale because at our stage, we are still building new products and we’re still figuring out what the industry needs. So really at our stage, we focus on hiring people with the drive and the hunger, and we focus less on the qualification. 

And typically these hackers, they typically take learning into their own hands. They do not wait for the school to teach them certain technologies or certain frameworks. They take it into their own hands and they make sure that they’re constantly learning and constantly pushing the boundary. That’s what we look for in early hires as an engineer. So we are still hiring. If you are listening to this and you are looking for a fun place to work at, where we constantly push the limits of technology and business, then hit me up. 

And because of the stage of our business, we really look for the hackers, the software engineers who are very good at delivering an MVP. They may or may not have an education in comp science, but they have the drive.”

Paulo: Well there you have it. I mean, you heard it guys, if you fit that description, then go ahead and reach out to Jasper.  I really like what you said about finding people who they’re sort of like mini founders in a way, trying to create what they want to do in life. We have one more question to really wrap up our  discussion on Eezee as a company. So I’d like to ask both of you, where do you see Eezee in the next five years? Shawn, go ahead.

Shawn: I’m looking at the business potential and landscape in Southeast Asia. If we look at industrial production in Southeast Asia, it’s about half a trillion dollars annually. We want to be in every single country. We want to be the number one B2B e-commerce platform, facilitating this industrial product trade, this half a trillion dollars. So it is very ambitious, but that’s where I genuinely see Eezee in the next five years. 

Paulo: Awesome. I love the numbers. How about you Jasper?

Jasper: So from a technology perspective, we see Eezee powering most of the procurement and supply chain systems in Southeast Asia. As I’ve said earlier, we want to become really that middleware, that infrastructure, the Suez Canal for commerce, of course, the better version where things don’t get stuck, that can really glue all these different ERP systems and inventory management systems and invoicing systems and finance systems. And we take all of those data points in all of those systems and we’ll link it up together. And that is what we see Eezee will become in the future: the middleware for procurement and supply chain management.

“That is what we see Eezee will become in the future: the middleware for procurement and supply chain management.”

Rapid Fire Round

Top Three Skills of a CTO?

Jasper: Critical thinking, effective communications, inventiveness

Top Three Skills of a CEO/CCO?

Shawn: Coaching business leaders, business analytics, effective communications 

If you could be in the shoes of any leade r or CEO for a day, who would it be?

Jasper: Yeah, I think definitely for the engineer or the CTO, it will be Elon Musk because Elon Musk has an engineering background. And today, he’s really doing groundbreaking work.

Shawn: It will be Jeff Bezos. I think he’s built a really incredible business. Amazon’s a behemoth. 

What’s the craziest item you’ve seen sold on Eezee marketplace?

Shawn: There was once a specific sourcing request to have an automated mahjong table as a product on our platform. And this was an enterprise purchase.

Jasper: Yeah, the most crazy purchase for me would have to be those automated sewing machines. When the purchase came in, it was north of $10,000. So It was a huge purchase. We were shocked because it was spent using a credit card..So the whole team, we were very shocked and we were asking ourselves…”Why would people come to us?” But we were very happy…

Anything you’d like to promote/share?

Jasper: So being a young entrepreneur and a first time founder, my heart goes out for all the entrepreneurs and all the students who are looking to start up. Right. So my word of advice or something that I would like to share that has helped me when I was building Eezee is that time is not on your site.

So if you’re starting a startup, you are a student or you are a first time founder trying to build a company. Time is not on your side. Don’t spend that extra time trying to make that slide deck perfect. Or if you’re an engineer, make that feature perfect. Because you do not have time. I would really encourage you to move fast. And focus on impact, focus on traction, focus on value. And I think that has helped Eezee and me and the co-founders prioritize what to do and where to bring the business next in our formative years. So really move fast, focus on impact.

Shawn: I think there’s a lot of people in Singapore who are still not yet in a startup space or in a tech investment.  There are a lot of uncertainties with COVID with job security and such, so quite aligned with Jasper’s message, for me, the only thing to fear is fear itself. If there’s something you really want to do, take that leap of faith and just do it. 

“Focus on impact, focus on traction, focus on value. And I think that has helped Eezee and me and the co-founders prioritize what to do and where to bring the business next in our formative years. So really move fast, focus on impact.”

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